Climate Parents Goal to Indoctrinate Students on Climate Change

Don’t Confuse Us With the Facts

ClimateParentsBanner

California-Based Group Promotes

Climate Change Indoctrination for Wyoming Students

Climate Parents is a national group that is involved in climate and social justice campaigns across our nation. They have recently targeted our state, claiming that “Wyoming is for coal over kids.”   They have even posted this message on their Facebook page banner.   They have also posted several press releases that smear the words of our State School Board Chairman and other elected leaders. They are attempting to influence decisions made by Wyoming citizens regarding the Next Generation Science Standards and their views on anthropogenic climate change. Climate Parents wants this taught as an accepted scientific fact.

Climate Parents and Citizens Engagement Lab are out of Berkeley, CA and New York, NY. They have had representatives on-site at a public meeting held in Casper prior to the SBE Meeting concerning the NGSS. The Wyoming Legislature defunded the implementation of the NGSS because of the outpouring of citizens’ voices. These voices were not just concerned about the teaching of climate, but the quality of the standards overall with weak content that was given a “C” rating by the Fordham Institute. This along with teaching anthropogenic climate change and Darwinian Evolution as settled science is the reason parents spoke up in Wyoming.

Lisa Hoyos is the co-founder of Climate Parents. Her bio on KeyWiki states, “In the mid 1990s Lisa Hoyos served on the Board of Directors Oakland based Institute for Social and Economic Studies- sponsor of Cross Roads magazine, which sought to promote dialogue and building new alliances among progressives and leftists… and to bring diverse Marxist and socialist traditions to bear while exploring new strategies and directions for the progressive political movements.”

It is quite clear what their agenda is as it is also freely stated on their website:

“Citizen Engagement Laboratory launched the CEL Climate Lab in 2011 to strengthen the U.S. climate organizing and communications landscape, particularly in terms of rapid response capacity. We believe the primary obstacle to climate action in the U.S. is a lack of cultural and political will, and we pursue three primary strategies for building that will:

  • Increase the Urgency. We help Americans recognize climate change as an urgent threat to our economy and safety.
  • Expand the Coalition. We seek to expand the coalition of those engaged in promoting climate action and a clean energy future.
  • Draw the Line. We strive to make those who deny climate science or stand in the way of action politically toxic.”

You can view a copy of their Open Letter to the State Board of Education HERE!

The majority of the 14,000 signatures on their petition are from out-of-state members. However, it is concerning that signatures from Wyoming educators, scientists and individuals are included and agree that the SBE should abandon the law as they, “urge the board to put legislative politics aside and carry out your duty to adopt [NGSS]. . . ”

Local control of education is where the power of the individual is heard. This is a parental right, for their voice to be heard and for it to be taken to the powers that can make change. This is what happened when the legislature acted.

You can very clearly see their agenda by visiting their website and Facebook page. In fact they are using a scare tactic to teach our children with cartoons and encouraging parents to have their children view them. This comic was produced in partnership by Years of Living Dangerously and Symbolia Magazine and can be seen HERE:

Action-Alert

If you haven’t already PLEASE write Wyoming legislators and the Governor to inform them of what this group is really about, and that you don’t want outside organizations to have influence over Wyoming policy. Only the voices of Wyoming citizens and parents of Wyoming children should count in this discussion, and Climate Parents as a national group has a political agenda and an utter disconnect with the realities of Wyoming’s needs, interests, and children. Further, what this group is actually advocating is that the SBE ignore the budget footnote before them and in fact, disregard the law. You may want to include pertinent links to Climate Parent websites we’ve provided in our article so legislators can see for themselves.  Contact info provided below:

Governor Mead: governor@wyo.gov

Mark.Baker@wyoleg.gov, Eric.Barlow@wyoleg.gov, Rosie.Berger@wyoleg.gov,
Stan.Blake@wyoleg.gov, Dave.Blevins@wyoleg.gov, Gregg.Blikre@wyoleg.gov,
Kermit.Brown@wyoleg.gov, Donald.Burkhart@wyoleg.gov, James.Byrd@wyoleg.gov,
Rita.Campbell@wyoleg.gov, Richard.Cannady@wyoleg.gov,
Kathy.Coleman@wyoleg.gov, Cathy.Connolly@wyoleg.gov,
Kathy.Davison@wyoleg.gov, John.Eklund@wyoleg.gov, Ken.Esquibel@wyoleg.gov,
Lee.Filer@wyoleg.gov, John.Freeman@wyoleg.gov, Gerald.Gay@wyoleg.gov,
Keith.Gingery@wyoleg.gov, Patrick.Goggles@wyoleg.gov, Mike.Greear@wyoleg.gov,
Matt.Greene@wyoleg.gov, Marti.Halverson@wyoleg.gov, Elaine.Harvey@wyoleg.gov,
Hans.Hunt@wyoleg.gov, Lynn.Hutchings@wyoleg.gov, Allen.Jaggi@wyoleg.gov,
Norine.Kasperik@wyoleg.gov, Dan.Kirkbride@wyoleg.gov,
Kendell.Kroeker@wyoleg.gov, Samuel.Krone@wyoleg.gov, Lloyd.Larsen@wyoleg.gov,
Tom.Lockhart@wyoleg.gov, Bunky.Loucks@wyoleg.gov, Tom.Lubnau@wyoleg.gov,
Robert.McKim@wyoleg.gov, David.Miller@wyoleg.gov, Glenn.Moniz@wyoleg.gov,
Bob.Nicholas@wyoleg.gov, David.Northrup@wyoleg.gov, John.Patton@wyoleg.gov,
Jerry.Paxton@wyoleg.gov, Ruth.Petroff@wyoleg.gov, Garry.Piiparinen@wyoleg.gov,
Tom.Reeder@wyoleg.gov, Mark.Semlek@wyoleg.gov, Albert.Sommers@wyoleg.gov,
Sue.Wallis@wyoleg.gov, Tom.Walters@wyoleg.gov, Stephen.Watt@wyoleg.gov,
Sue.Wilson@wyoleg.gov, Nathan.Winters@wyoleg.gov, David.Zwonitzer@wyoleg.gov,
Dan.Zwonitzer@wyoleg.gov, Jim.Anderson.SD28@wyoleg.gov,
Paul.Barnard@wyoleg.gov, Eli.Bebout@wyoleg.gov, Bruce.Burns@wyoleg.gov,
Cale.Case@wyoleg.gov, Leland.Christensen@wyoleg.gov, Stan.Cooper@wyoleg.gov,
Bernadine.Craft@wyoleg.gov, Dan.Dockstader@wyoleg.gov,
Ogden.Driskill@wyoleg.gov, Fred.Emerich@wyoleg.gov, Floyd.Esquibel@wyoleg.gov,
Gerald.Geis@wyoleg.gov, John.Hastert@wyoleg.gov, Larry.Hicks@wyoleg.gov,
John.Hines@wyoleg.gov, Wayne.Johnson@wyoleg.gov, Curt.Meier@wyoleg.gov,
Leslie.Nutting@wyoleg.gov, Drew.Perkins@wyoleg.gov, Ray.Peterson@wyoleg.gov,
Tony.Ross@wyoleg.gov, John.Schiffer@wyoleg.gov, Charles.Scott@wyoleg.gov,
Michael.VonFlatern@wyoleg.gov

 

 

Take Action! Advocate for an Elected State Board of Education: Legislators Ask to Hear from the People!

Advocate for an Elected State Board of Education:

Legislators Ask to Hear from the People!

The budget footnote that prohibited the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards demonstrates that the legislature is responding to the people’s concerns over standards adoption and data collection and sharing in Wyoming.

We now have a tremendous opportunity before us!  This is the legislature’s way of responding to the flood of communication they’ve received over education issues this year, and it’s a golden opportunity to be heard.

Let legislators know that you think the State Board should be an elected body, accountable to the people, not political appointees. This would begin a return to local control over education in Wyoming.

THIS FRIDAY  April 25th

Joint Education Committee Hearing

9:00am

Room 302 of the Capitol Building

This public hearing is dealing with the organization of state administration of public education. One of the proposals has been to make the State Board of Education an elected, rather than appointed, body.

You may find the meeting announcement and a link to the agenda here. (http://legisweb.state.wy.us/interimCommittee/2014/04MTG0425.pdf)

TAKE ACTION:

  1. If possible, plan to attend the hearing and testify. Appearing in person has the greatest impact and allows you an opportunity establish relationship and credibility with legislators before and after the meeting. Bring 15 copies of your testimony or submit them to Dave Nelson at lso@wyoleg.gov.
  2. If you cannot attend, contact Dave Nelson at lso@wyoleg.gov with your written testimony, saying you are unable to attend but want to submit comment for the April 25th meeting of the Joint Education Committee.

Thank you for your help as we work to bring local control back to Wyoming Edcuation!

Picture2

 

State Board of Education Considers What to Do about NGSS: Wyoming Citizens Opposing Common Core Reacts

April 11, 2014 – Casper Wyoming – State Board of Education Meeting

In a meeting characterized both by procedural irregularities and emotion, Wyoming’s State Board of Education ultimately sent the proposed science standards back to the Review Committee for reworking. While unclear how much of the Next Generation Science Standards could be included in the final product, board members voiced a need for A-rated standards that will benefit Wyoming students and be free of controversial assumptions. The committee will be allowed to use the NGSS as a model, but it appeared that using other state standards as models will be expected as well.

Public comment was rearranged on the agenda to allow comments to be heard before the vote on the outcome of the NGSS. A group called Climate Parents, some of whom we believe traveled in from out of state, organized statements to support the NGSS and the teaching of anthropogenic global warming in classrooms, and a teacher brought students to do so as well. However, the students did not appear either personally invested or prepared to articulate that position.

Wyoming Citizens Opposing Common Core also organized statements among participants who could attend the meeting.  Members pointed out that the budget footnote was the correct response of the Legislature to concerned citizens and expressed reasons to push for more academically sound and objective standards than the NGSS. We were joined by Representative Tom Reeder, Representative Lynn Hutchings and Michelle Sabrosky, who also contributed valuable testimony. We so appreciate the time everyone took out of their personal lives to make a strong showing at this meeting.

Several testifying, including both legislators, asserted this meeting or ANY consideration of NGSS, even as a model, is not legal given the budget footnote’s restriction on funds. In spite of this concern, the board proceeded to take action, and in the weeks to come, the legality of is the footnote will likely be investigated.

Some board members were anxious to adopt the NGSS for promulgation in spite of the legislature’s budget footnote “effective immediately” due to their own interpretation of the footnote’s effective date. Some board members like the NGSS and expressed concern we wouldn’t have “21st Century Standards” available immediately for our schools. Others clearly were in favor of making the rejection of the standards the Governor’s problem by forcing him to veto the vote for promulgation, as Mary Kay Hill said she would advise the Governor to do should the state board move forward and adopt these standards. However, the vote to adopt for promulgation ultimately failed this time.

The initial vote to send the standards back to the Review Committee also failed, as did a motion to approve the resolution by the Supervisory Committee members to stop this process and allow school districts to choose their own science standards. There was a great deal of contentious discussion, frustration and consultation with legal counsel during the entire meeting, which even went to executive session at one point. It was clear no one wanted to leave the room having done “nothing”, so it finally came back to a vote to reconsider the motion to send the standards back to the Review Committee, and that motion in the end passed.

It will be crucial now for citizens to monitor this process, participate in opportunities to contribute and be watchful for the necessary changes in the standards. As Mary Kay Hill stated as she outlined the position of the Governor’s office, citizen engagement like this is unprecedented and a great opportunity to have genuine, open discussion and participation. Our state can end up with academically sound standards that stay religiously neutral and scientifically objective and be the best in the country!

Public Comments made to the State Board of Education Meeting on Next Generation Science Standards on 4/11/14

Become-an-Activist-Journalist-Step-5

I’m saddened by some of the media coverage by journalists in our state. Poor reporting causes citizens to misunderstand the true purpose of those speaking against the Next Generation Science Standards. The statements provided by concerned citizens at this meeting are provided for you here:

Chairman Micheli and Members of the Board,

I am Christy Hooley, an educator and mother of three small children.

I represent Wyoming Citizens Opposing Common Core and a member of Citizens for Objective Public Education, (COPE) a national non-profit organization.

COPE has written a thorough analysis of the K-12 Framework and Next Generation Science Standards. In the interest of time I provided the reference to their analysis in my hand out with my full remarks. In short, COPE’s analysis shows that the Framework and Standards are establishing a non-theistic religious worldview within science education.

In September 2013, COPE filed suit in the 10th District Court Appeals, which has jurisdiction over Wyoming, under the premise that NGSS presents a non-theistic religious world view in contradiction to state and federal Constitutional provisions. This lawsuit is still being adjudicated and I suggest it would be wise for Wyoming to wait on the results of the lawsuit before adopting NGSS. A link to this complaint is included in my handout. I appreciate that in the complaint COPE also includes solutions to resolve the problems with NGSS. These solutions focus on the teaching of origins science (the cause and nature of life and the universe); the appropriate developmental stage at which it should be taught, how it should be approached with regards to religious neutrality, and its objective non-dogmatic (including non-atheistic) presentation. I would recommend your reading of such solutions in the handout.

A lawsuit, claiming that a framework and accompanying standards seeks to establish a materialistic/atheistic worldview, throughout a child’s entire 13 year public education experience, is a very serious allegation that shouldn’t be ignored. The thought is chilling as all theistic viewpoints have been intentionally removed from the standards. We are now learning that in its place will be a non-theistic belief system. This is terrifying to a parent that believes in God.

In addition, such teaching of a non-theistic worldview infringes on the religious rights of parents as protected in the 1st amendment of the US Constitution and in Article 7, Section 12 of the Wyoming State Constitution. NGSS forces teachers to instruct students in the non-theistic worldview, regardless of the teachers’ personal beliefs, and such teaching puts young children in a dissonant position of trying to decide whom to trust, parents or teachers. As John Goodlad has stated, in Developing Democratic Character in the Youth, “Public education has served as a check on the power of parents, and this is another powerful reason for maintaining it.” This statement speaks to exactly what the creators of the Framework and NGSS are creating. A check on parents!
Additionally, our state legislature has gone on record expressing its lack of confidence in the NGSS and explicitly added a footnote to the budget immediately restricting use of state funds to further adoption or implementation of NGSS. I believe it is the State Board of Education’s duty to follow the letter and spirit of that footnote and to do otherwise would be insubordination as the operates under the legislature’s direction.

My hope is that if you still consider adopting the Framework and NGSS that you first invite COPE and other knowledgeable educators and scientists to explain the problems in more detail and consider alternative solutions.

You as directors of a public body, have a duty of due diligence. The COPE suit triggers a need for you to seriously and objectively investigate the claims of that complaint before you act.

Christy Hooley
WCOCC/WAC/COPE

My name is Elizabeth Bingham and I am from Sweetwater County.
I am here today, so I can be on record to share my concerns with respect to the science standards and the NGSS.
In last month’s meeting, an exhaustive discussion about the budget amendment footnote took place, and it was suggested that you might pass the NGSS anyway and “wait to see what happens”. This is very disturbing. As one of the parents who asked my elected representatives to vote for the budget amendment, YOU as an appointed board, have no right to take away my representation.
The footnote clearly states, no money shall be expended for review or adoption of NGSS and it is effective immediately. This does not mean, beginning the first day of the next fiscal year, it means at once, instantly, without any intervening time.
I caution you in using the “wait and see” approach, not only do I feel it is inherently wrong, but I think a lawsuit will follow. The public (that you are appointed to represent) is awake to this nonsense, and is in no mood to see any more money thrown at this approach.
During the discussion about developing new science standards and the overlap with NGSS, a board member stated something to the effect of “Let me read a standard: The sun warms the Earth. How are we going to avoid adopting standards that say that?” This kind of discussion is deliberately pointless and brings the problem solving process to a halt. We, the people, expect a thoughtful and intelligent approach to solving problems. It is not difficult to understand that any material that is not specifically developed by Achieve can be used in developing science standards.
NGSS is no different from Common Core.
The copyrighted NGSS states: Alteration of any language in the standards is considered non-permissible. Is this the real reason, after alleged hours spent in committee, why modifications haven’t been made?
We want a common sense approach to developing standards that are balanced, accurate and without a hidden agenda. We don’t want to be bound to something that continues on the path of diminishing our sovereignty over education.
I didn’t come here today in my horse and buggy nor am I a member of the Flat Earth Society. I love science, science is everywhere and in everything we do. I simply believe in the fundamental rights of parents and want facts taught as facts, and theories taught as theories.
If we really have such abysmal science standards, and that is the reason for the urgency to adopt NGSS, why wasn’t this taken care of in 2008? Why were the changes in 2008 insignificant? Who is going to be fired or have the ethical decency to claim responsibility for teaching children sub-par science standards for over ten years?
Starting fresh, with an improved process, is not the overwhelming task that some of you are making it seem. I would argue, that with the collective intellect, education, talent, work backgrounds and life experience of all of the members of these committees, boards etc. that you can develop the BEST science standards in the nation and make Wyoming a leader in education. That is, if you choose to stop following everyone else in pursuing a one size, fits all, prepackaged bill of goods that is being peddled to the states.
I want Wyoming to have the best science standards, but I also want Wyoming to OWN them.

NGSS, Bottom Line on “Public Comment”

My name is Cynthia McKee. I live in Savery, where I’m a partner in a cattle ranch and the mother of two school-aged children.

I am one of the many constituents who have been communicating with lawmakers and in particular, my representatives in Wyoming legislature, sharing my concerns over Common Core, our commitment to data collection and sharing, and the Next Generation Science Standards. After a year now of intense work and research, after countless hours and for some, great personal sacrifice, there is finally one tangible result.

This budget amendment you are dealing with now did not appear out of nowhere. It is not something to be averted by rebranding, or avoided on a legal technicality. It represents the proper workings of a republic. Enough constituents spoke up to cause the legislature to intervene in this process. And I am glad they did!

Whether the NGSS are right or wrong to adopt, the legislature did its job by forcing us all to take a closer look at alternatives to something too many Wyoming residents have legitimate concerns over. We expect your proper response to legislature’s restriction.

You will likely be told today that not adopting the NGSS is a bad idea, that Wyoming is “anti-science” if we don’t, that the objections are merely “political”.

Let’s talk facts. The NGSS are weak – we can’t use them to put together a high school chemistry or physics class. How does THAT prepare our kids for STEM careers? The adoption of the NGSS face a serious legal challenge in Kansas, very likely headed to circuit court, whose decision we will have to abide by. The NGSS also promote a very negative view on the use of natural resources and assume unverified theories as fact.

You may hear today that 97% of scientists agree that man’s activities cause global warming, and therefore we need that perspective assumed in these standards, even though there is substantial evidence to the contrary. The only problem is, consensus is not a scientific value – it’s a political value. Remember, scientists also used to agree that the sun revolved around the earth. Evidence proved them wrong. The teaching and learning of science needs to be characterized by unfettered examination and analysis of evidence, not indoctrination.

You have this dilemma before you, in part, because many Wyoming stakeholders in education feel burned by what they feel was a stealth initiative when it comes to adoption of the Common Core. I am aware that most members of this board defend both the process in place and its adherence to it. The process, we are told, involves parents, community members, teachers, and the public. With this in mind, I have one question about the public comment period, because this is where I can participate.

Even though I, and no one I knew, had a clue what Common Core was or that a public comment period was going on at the time, there were a significant number of people who spoke against their adoption. The Common Core was still adopted, so obviously there weren’t enough. What I want to know is, how much objection is enough? 50%? 60%? 75% of people testifying? Have you ever thought about that? Is it in writing somewhere?

If public comment really matters, then that number should be known so the public is aware of its precise impact on standards adoption. Citizens need to not only know that public comment is taken, but that their input is more than a mere exercise, a check box at the end of a list that the State Board can say its’ completed. They need to know for certain that public comment is not only accepted, but has impact on the outcome.

I encourage you to examine this process with humble hearts, and look forward to an answer to this vital question.

Thank you.

 

There were several other parents that also gave comments against NGSS.  I will post those as I receive permsisson to do so. 

Teleconferenced State Board Meeting on Monday at 1PM

kidsoncell

The Wyoming State Board of Education meeting on Monday, March 24th at 1pm will be a teleconference meeting. It is OPEN to the public and they will be taking public comment at the end of the meeting. To listen to the meeting:

1) Dial 1-877-278-8686
2) Enter this Global PIN when prompted: 315908

There will be discussion on the amendment to the Budget regarding the blocking of the NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards). There is a group petitioning to have this decision reversed. You can read an article in the Casper Star Tribune HERE <=== about Climate Parent’s Petition.

Topics for the Meeting listed HERE <===. 

Agenda for the Board Meeting HERE <===. 

Wyoming Citizens Opposing Common Core’s Press Release in response to this petition can be read HERE <===. 

Stay involved and engaged as this conversation continues!

Uinta County Conservation District Concerned with The Next Generation Science Standards

UintaCountyConservationDistrict

The Uinta County Conservation District has released a letter they sent to the Wyoming State Board of Education addressing their concerns with the Next Generation Science Standards.  I have obtained permission from Briar Harris, Education Coordinator for the Uinta County Conservation District to publish the letter.  This letter was also sent to all Conservation Districts throughout the state. I have also included Briar’s commentary on the research and reason for concern below.

1-7-14 Letter NGSS 1st page 001

Click Letter to Enlarge

1-7-2014 Letter NGSS Signature 001

The Next Generation Science Standards: Reason for concern

Core Idea LS4

Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

Biological evolution explains both the unity and the diversity of species and provides a unifying principle for the history and diversity of life on Earth. [1]

Evolution and its underlying genetic mechanisms of inheritance and variability are key to understanding both the unity and the diversity of life on Earth. [2]

Grade Band Endpoints for LS2.C

By the end of grade 12.

A complex set of interactions within an ecosystem can keep its numbers and types of organisms relatively constant over long periods of time under stable conditions. If a modest biological or physical disturbance to an ecosystem occurs, it may return to its more or less original status (i.e., the ecosystem is resilient), as opposed to becoming a very different ecosystem. Extreme fluctuations in conditions or the size of any population, however, can challenge the functioning of ecosystems in terms of resources and habitat availability. Moreover, anthropogenic changes (induced by human activity) in the environment—including habitat destruction, pollution, introduction of invasive species, overexploitation, and climate change—can disrupt an ecosystem and threaten the survival of some species.[3]

Evolution is being taught as a fact rather than what it is: Theory.

LS4.D: BIODIVERSITY AND HUMANS

What is biodiversity, how do humans affect it, and how does it affect humans?

Human beings are part of and depend on the natural world. Biodiversity—the multiplicity of genes, species, and ecosystems—provides humans with renewable resources, such as food, medicines, and clean water. Humans also benefit from “ecosystem services,” such as climate stabilization, decomposition of wastes, and pollination that are provided by healthy (i.e., diverse and resilient) ecosystems. The resources of biological communities can be used within sustainable limits, but in many cases humans affect these ecosystems in ways—including habitat destruction, pollution of air and water, overexploitation of resources, introduction of invasive species, and climate change—that prevent the sustainable use of resources and lead to ecosystem degradation, species extinction, and the loss of valuable ecosystem services.[4]

But human activity is also having adverse impacts on biodiversity through overpopulation, overexploitation, habitat destruction, pollution, introduction of invasive species, and climate change. These problems have the potential to cause a major wave of biological extinctions—as many species or populations of a given species, unable to survive in changed environments, die out—and the effects may be harmful to humans and other living things.[5]

Humans have not only had negative effect on our natural resources but also positive effects.  Are humans really the source of all that is negative?  Do humans not take care of our natural resources?  What do many agencies like the Conservation Districts do?  Should we maybe point out the good things?

ESS2.D: WEATHER AND CLIMATE

What regulates weather and climate?

The “greenhouse effect” keeps Earth’s surface warmer than it would be otherwise. [6]

By the end of grade 8. …….Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere absorb and retain the energy radiated from land and ocean surfaces, thereby regulating Earth’s average surface temperature and keeping it habitable.[7]

By the end of grade 12. ….. Changes in the atmosphere due to human activity have increased carbon dioxide concentrations and thus affect climate (link to ESS3.D).[8]

Global climate models incorporate scientists’ best knowledge of physical and chemical processes and of the interactions of relevant systems. They are tested by their ability to fit past climate variations. Current models predict that, although future regional climate changes will be complex and varied, average global temperatures will continue to rise. The outcomes predicted by global climate models strongly depend on the amounts of human-generated greenhouse gases added to the atmosphere each year and by the ways in which these gases are absorbed by the ocean and the biosphere. Hence the outcomes depend on human behaviors (link to ESS3.D) as well as on natural factors that involve complex feedbacks among Earth’s systems (link to ESS2.A).[9]

ESS2.E: BIOGEOLOGY

How do living organisms alter Earth’s processes and structures?

Organisms ranging from bacteria to human beings are a major driver of the global carbon cycle, and they influence global climate by modifying the chemical makeup of the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases in particular are continually moved through the reservoirs represented by the ocean, land, life, and atmosphere. [10]

  1. Again a theory, Greenhouse gases being taught as fact.

  2. Yet again it implies humans are a detriment to society.

Core Idea ESS3

Earth and Human Activity

How do Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?

Earth’s surface processes affect and are affected by human activities. Humans depend on all of the planet’s systems for a variety of resources, some of which are renewable or replaceable and some of which are not. Natural hazards and other geological events can significantly alter human populations and activities. Human activities, in turn, can contribute to the frequency and intensity of some natural hazards. Indeed, humans have become one of the most significant agents of change in Earth’s surface systems. In particular, it has been shown that climate change—which could have large consequences for all of Earth’s surface systems, including the biosphere—is driven not only by natural effects but also by human activities. [11]

Humans as it states have become one of the most significant agents of change in the Earth’s surface. It goes on to say “In particular, ….climate change.”  Once again humans are bad and we have caused problems such as intensity of some natural hazards and climate change.

ESS3.A: NATURAL RESOURCES

How do humans depend on Earth’s resources?

All forms of resource extraction and land use have associated economic, social, environmental, and geopolitical costs and risks, as well as benefits. New technologies and regulations can change the balance of these factors—for example, scientific modeling of the long-term environmental impacts of resource use can help identify potential problems and suggest desirable changes in the patterns of use. Much energy production today comes from nonrenewable sources, such as coal and oil. [12] However, advances in related science and technology are reducing the cost of energy from renewable resources, such as sunlight, and some regulations are favoring their use. As a result, future energy supplies are likely to come from a much wider range of sources.[13]

They have in here given us a solution to the problems humans have caused: regulations! Regulations it implies will be our saving grace as they favor renewable resources such as sunlight.  It states that science and technology are reducing the cost of renewable resources, however, it never mentions that they are not a viable solution to our energy crisis at this point because the government is subsidizing the push for renewable resources and without government subsidizing no company could even afford to be in business related to the renewable energies.  Not only do we pay higher prices for renewable energy through our utilities we also pay more taxes to subsidize them.

ESS3.B: NATURAL HAZARDS

How do natural hazards affect individuals and societies?

Human activities can contribute to the frequency and intensity of some natural hazards (e.g., flooding, forest fires), and risks from natural hazards increase as populations—and population densities—increase in vulnerable locations.[14]

Grade Band Endpoints for ESS3.B

By the end of grade 5…Humans cannot eliminate natural hazards but can take steps to reduce their impacts.

By the end of grade 12…Human activities can contribute to the frequency and intensity of some natural hazards.

Did the Endpoints for grade 5 and 12 just contradict one another?  I believe so.  If we can contribute to the frequency and intensity of natural hazards then by not doing whatever it is that we to do contribute shouldn’t we be able to eliminate some natural hazards?  What natural hazards to humans contribute to?

ESS3.C: HUMAN IMPACTS ON EARTH SYSTEMS

How do humans change the planet?

Recorded history, as well as chemical and geological evidence, indicates that human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major impacts on the land, rivers, ocean, and air. Humans affect the quality, availability, and distribution of Earth’s water through the modification of streams, lakes, and groundwater. Large areas of land, including such delicate ecosystems as wetlands, forests, and grasslands, are being transformed by human agriculture, mining, and the expansion of settlements and roads. Human activities now cause land erosion and soil movement annually that exceed all natural processes. Air and water pollution caused by human activities affect the condition of the atmosphere and of rivers and lakes, with damaging effects on other species and on human health. The activities of humans have significantly altered the biosphere, changing or destroying natural habitats and causing the extinction of many living species. [15]These changes also affect the viability of agriculture or fisheries to support human populations. Land use patterns for agriculture and ocean use patterns for fishing are affected not only by changes in population and needs but also by changes in climate or local conditions (such as desertification due to overuse or depletion of fish populations by overextraction).

Thus humans have become one of the most significant agents of change in the near-surface Earth system. And because all of Earth’s subsystems are interconnected, changes in one system can produce unforeseen changes in others.

Some negative effects of human activities are reversible with informed and responsible management. ….. Regulations regarding water and air pollution have greatly reduced acid rain and stream pollution, and international treaties on the use of certain refrigerant gases have halted the growth of the annual ozone hole over Antarctica. Regulation of fishing and the development of marine preserves can help restore and maintain fish populations. In addition, the development of alternative energy sources can reduce the environmental impacts otherwise caused by the use of fossil fuels.[16]

If this doesn’t give you pause then I don’t know what will.  Not only does it focus only on the negative effects humans have had and will continue to have but it also poses the solutions of regulations and international treaties!  Is that what Wyoming is about, regulations and international treaties as solutions to all our problems?

Recorded history, as well as chemical and geological evidence, indicates that human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major impacts on the land, rivers, ocean, and air.

By the end of grade 5. Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and even outer space. But individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth’s resources and environments..…. regulating sources of pollution such as emissions from factories and power plants or the runoff from agricultural activities.

By the end of grade 8. Human activities have significantly altered the biosphere, sometimes damaging or destroying natural habitats and causing the extinction of many other species.

By the end of grade 12. When the source of an environmental problem is understood and international agreement can be reached, human activities can be regulated to mitigate global impacts (e.g., acid rain and the ozone hole near Antarctica).[17]

Hasn’t agriculture and industry been the catalyst for the progression of the human race?  Isn’t the farmer and rancher the first conversationalist?  They have done more in the way of sustaining human life through responsible farming and ranching practices.  They see the error of a practice quickly and change it just as quickly.  Natural resources are how they make a living, they would never intentionally do anything to compromise them in any way.  They continually look for ways to improve and protect the natural resources.

ESS3.D: GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

How do people model and predict the effects of human activities on Earth’s climate?

Global climate change, shown to be driven by both natural phenomena and by human activities, could have large consequences for all of Earth’s surface systems, including the biosphere (see ESS3.C for a general discussion of climate). Humans are now so numerous and resource dependent that their activities affect every part of the environment, from outer space and the stratosphere to the deepest ocean.[18]

By the end of grade 8. Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, are major factors in the current rise in Earth’s mean surface temperature (global warming). Reducing human vulnerability to whatever climate changes do occur depend on the understanding of climate science, engineering capabilities, and other kinds of knowledge, such as understanding of human behavior and on applying that knowledge wisely in decisions and activities.

By the end of grade 12. Global climate models are often used to understand the process of climate change because these changes are complex and can occur slowly over Earth’s history. Though the magnitudes of humans’ impacts are greater than they have ever been, so too are humans’ abilities to model, predict, and manage current and future impacts. Through computer simulations and other studies, important discoveries are still being made about how the ocean, the atmosphere, and the biosphere interact and are modified in response to human activities, as well as to changes in human activities. Thus science and engineering will be essential both to understanding the possible impacts of global climate change and to informing decisions about how to slow its rate and consequences—for humanity as well as for the rest of the planet.[19]

Global Warming whether you believe in it or not is only a theory, it is not fact.  There is science both for and against it and as such should never be taught in our schools as fact.  Schools should teach facts as facts and theories as theories!

ETS2.B: INFLUENCE OF ENGINEERING, TECHNOLOGY, AND SCIENCE ON SOCIETY AND THE NATURAL WORLD

How do science, engineering, and the technologies that result from them affect the ways in which people live? How do they affect the natural world?

From the earliest forms of agriculture to the latest technologies, all human activity has drawn on natural resources and has had both short- and long-term consequences, positive as well as negative, for the health of both people and the natural environment. These consequences have grown stronger in recent human history. Society has changed dramatically, and human populations and longevity have increased…

Not only do science and engineering affect society, but society’s decisions (whether made through market forces or political processes) influence the work of scientists and engineers. These decisions sometimes establish goals and priorities for improving or replacing technologies; at other times they set limits, such as in regulating the extraction of raw materials or in setting allowable levels of pollution from mining, farming, and industry.[20]

By the end of grade 8. All human activity draws on natural resources and has both short- and long-term consequences, positive as well as negative, for the health of both people and the natural environment.[21]

Do we want regulations as this says in extraction of raw materials or allowable levels of pollution from mining, farming and industry?

In reading through The Next Generation Science Standards although they are more comprehensive standards than what we now have in Wyoming, they are not conducive in my opinion to who we are in Wyoming.  The under tones of the human population being already overpopulated and that human impact on the Earth has been negative at best is simply WRONG!

I have intentionally copied and pasted every word in black directly from the WordPress website, from the “A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts and Core Ideas” as well as adding footnotes.  I want you to only have the facts!  In reading through this and spending hours and hours wading through misconceptions and someone else’s interpretations of what the standards were I was able to find what the facts are.  My intention in this is so that if you have any questions you will not have to go through all the hoops and unnecessary hours of time to look up the facts if you would like.   When it all came down to the nuts and bolts I learned that very, very few people in Wyoming have the facts, they frankly don’t have the time or know how to do what I spent weeks doing.  The bullet points that are published only give a small portion and many “in the know” or who should be, haven’t read through the standards themselves.

It is no secret that Wyoming is near the bottom of the barrel when it comes to our science standards and have been lacking for some time.  The consensus is that we all want better standards for the students of Wyoming.  What we don’t want is to hastily adopt standards written by people who don’t value the same things we do.  The people of Wyoming may not have “caught up” to the ideologies of the rest of the nation or the world, but is that what we really want.  Isn’t what makes Wyoming so special is that we believe in the “good ol’ boy” way of life?  We go against the grain, fight for what is right and true and never back down when it comes to our beliefs.  We believe in doing what’s right, in fact we didn’t just come to that but have lived it from the very beginning.  The farmers and ranchers of this country and Wyoming have led in innovation, conservation and the protection of our rights and freedoms.  Are we now going to let what our fore fathers fought with blood, sweat and tears for, to be trampled on each and every day in our schools?  Teaching the next generation that more government, more regulations, more international treaties, more involvement in our lives, taking away our freedoms is what is best for their future and ours.

I urge you to look carefully at these standards.  In fact don’t take my word for it research it for yourselves.  Contact me for any questions or more information.  More importantly once you have read the facts, if you don’t agree with these standards MAKE A STANCE!  If we do nothing they will be our standards.  They will be taught to the next generation and we will be to blame for doing nothing.

Briar Harris, Education Coordinator

Uinta County Conservation District

bharris@bvea.net


[1] 6 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Life Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[2]  6 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Life Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[3]  6 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Life Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[4] 6 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Life Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[5] 6 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Life Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[6] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[7] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[8] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[9] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[10] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[11] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[12] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[13]  7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[14] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[15] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[16] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[17] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[18] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[19] 7 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Earth and Space Sciences .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[20] 8 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

[21] 8 Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas – Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Science .” A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012 .

Sign THIS Letter for NO NGSS in Your School District!!

SAY NO to NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS

The State School Board in Wyoming is looking at adopting a set of science standards for public
school students that are concerning. Many people around Wyoming have let the State Board know that they do not want these standards adopted for our kids, but it still looks like they will accept them anyway.

Your local district has the opportunity to  let the State Board know that these are
not the right choice of Wyoming.

Please consider signing this letter asking our local School Board
to take a stance.

If you and your spouse share the same email address, please list “Joe & Jane” in the first name column.

The program only allows an email to be used once.

Click on your district to read and sign the letter.

Sweetwater County School District #1

Sweetwater County School District #2

Park County School District 1

Park County School District 6

Campell County 1

Teton County 1

If your county is not available please email:

contact@wyomingcitizensopposingcommoncore.com